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A guide to the OZEV Grants

The Office for Zero Emission Vehicles (OZEV) offers grant funding towards the cost of an electric vehicle charging station.

For the most up-to-date information please visit the OZEV website.

The OLEV grant schemes are changing as of April 1st 2020. For the most up to date information please visit the OLEV website. 

This page is correct for grants submitted up to 31st March 2020.  We will update this guidance as soon as possible. 

 

Please get in touch if you have any questions.

  • Can I overcharge my vehicle?
    No. You are unable to overcharge your vehicle because the power flow is ended automatically by an integrated charging management system. The flow will be stopped once the EV is 'full', so leaving your EV plugged in is not a problem. If you are leaving your vehicle unused for a significant amount of time, it may be better for the battery if it is not left fully charged. Consult your vehicle dealer for advice on your vehicle model.
  • Can't I just charge my car on a socket at home?
    Yes, you can charge using a 3-pin plug at home but it is not recommended. Normal household sockets and wiring are not designed to take such a high continuous load. Regular charging should be done using a charge point that is able to safely take the continuous load, installed on a separate circuit right back to the 'consumer unit' or fuseboard. Using a 3-pin plug should only be done when no other option is available. If you do have to charge with a 3 pin plug, then we recommend having your electrics checked first by a qualified electrician to help to minimise risk. Before each charge, it is good practice to inspect the plugs, fuse and cable to check for any signs of wear which could influence your charge.
  • Are there grants to help towards the cost of installing an EV charger?
    Yes. The UK Government's Office of Low Emission Vehicles (OLEV) offer two types of grant; domestic (EVHS) and workplace (WCS). Each grant is for the value of 75% of the cost of a charger and installation, capped at £500. The two grants have specific criteria which you must meet to be eligible. To read our full guide to the OLEV grants click here or visit the OLEV website directly.
  • How do I apply for a workplace charger grant?
    Applicants must apply for the Workplace Charge Scheme (WCS) via an online portal. If the application is deemed to be eligible, then the applicant will be issued with a unique identification code via email which will be valid for four months/ 120 days from the date of issue. Once the chargepoints have been installed, the OLEV approved installer will claim the grant using the unique code given. Installations made after the 4 month validation period cannot be claimed for. Read our full guide to the OLEV grants here.
  • What 'real world' range can I expect from a vehicle?
    Just like with a petrol or diesel vehicle, 'manufacturers range' and 'real world range' are usually different; we suggest that taking 10% off the manufactures estimated range is usually offers a good guide. However, driving style and location have the largest influence on range. Driving moderately and conserving your speed will pay back in terms of range. Urban drivers who face low speed limits and generally flat ground will get a better range than rural drivers who face national speed limits and uneven ground. The bottom line is how you drive has a huge influence on range, just like a conventional vehicle. Drivers who are concious of this can (and do!) meet the expected manufacturers range from their vehicle. We have been driving EVs rurally for almost 20 years, and we have never ran out of juice! The only real difference to consider is seasonality. Using more 'stuff' on your vehicle will draw more power, so blasting your heater or air con will reduce your range slightly. Across peak summer and peak winter seasons using the air con or heater have much the same affect on range. The important thing to note is that in winter the battery capacity is affected by the cooler air temperature. In winter you will not get the same range as in the summer; it will be lower. This is because the colder temperatures cause the chemical reactions inside the battery to occur at a slower rate, so cold batteries discharge faster than warmer batteries. This doesnt mean that EVs don't work in the cold, they do, its just something to consider. A good resource to use for in depth vehicle reviews is Honest John.
  • What different types of electric vehicles are there? (BEV, PHEV and HEV)"
    It is generally accepted that there are 3 main types of electric vehicle; battery electric vehicles (BEVs), plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV) and hybrid electric vehicles (HEV). BEVs (more commonly known simply as EVs) are fully electric vehicles with rechargable batteries; they have no combustion engine and are 'fuelled' solely by using electricity. They also recoup energy by using the electric motor as a generator when slowing down, also minimising the production of brake dust by reduced wear on the conventional brakes. PHEVs have a battery much the same as a BEV, however it is much smaller. Once the battery power has been utilised, the vehicle continues to be powered by a combustion engine. PHEVs have a electric range of between 10-40 miles. A 'traditional' hybrid vehicle (HEV) has a very small battery which is used in connection with the combustion engine. The main difference between a PHEV and a HEV is the ability to charge the battery. You are unable to plug in a HEV to charge the battery, it is instead charged by the combustion engine. Using a battery in conjunction with the combustion engine offers slightly reduced tail pipe emissions, but ultimately HEVs are being charged by the combustion engine. There is no such thing as a 'self-charging' hybrid vehicle. For more information read our full guide to electric vehicle charging.
  • What are the different types of charging? (slow, fast and rapid)"
    There are 3 different types of charging; typically called 'slow', 'fast' and 'rapid' in the UK. Slow charging occurs at 3kW, and is most common in UK homes. At 3kW, a full charge is likely to take 5-8 hours, so slow charging is perfect for overnight use. Fast charging occurs at 7kW-22kW; a full charge at 7kW can typically take around 3-5 hours and at 22kW this could be reduced to as little as 2-3 hours. Charging above 7kW requires 'three phase' electricity which is not normally available in UK homes, but is often available elsewhere. Rapid charging can fill a vehicle battery by 80% in as little as 20 minutes. Rapid chargers are most commonly found at motorway services and at electric forecourts, where charging occurs at between 50kW and 350kW. It is important to note that these figures are only a guide, charging speed depends not only on the charger, but also the capability of the vehicle and the size of the vehicle's battery. For more information read our full guide to electric vehicle charging.
  • What types of charging plugs are there?
    Both EVs and PHEVs have built in batteries which needs to be recharged from an external mains supply. The vehicles have inlets for a charging cable to be connected to, but they are not all the same. The inlet on the vehicle will depend on manufacturers choice. Vehicles usually have two charging inlets; one for AC charging and one for DC. AC is used for slow and fast charging and DC is used for rapid charging. But sometimes vehicles have only one inlet for used for all charging. For AC charging, the Type 1 or Type 2 plug is used, and for DC CHAdeMO and CCS are used. Click here for a detailed explaination of the available charging plugs.
  • How do I apply for a home charger grant?
    The Electric Vehicle Homecharge Scheme (EVHS) requires each grant claim to be submitted using a form which includes a customer declaration. The authorised chargepoint installer will claim the 75% of the cost, up to £500, on behalf of the customer, and the rest of the payment must be agreed privately. If the form is filled out incorrectly then the claim will be marked as invalid, and payment will not be made. Read our full guide to the OLEV grants here.
  • Do I have 'three-phase' electricity?
    Three-phase electricity is a method of AC power transmission and distribution used to transfer power around the National Grid, right down to street level. It is unlikely that you have three-phase power at home (only around 5% of UK homes do and these are often very large homes or farms) but most businesses do have three-phase. To determine if you do have three-phase power, please consult your electrician or contact us.
  • Why do EVs charge at different rates?
    Charging speed depends not only on the capability of the charger / electrical connection (see above question), but also on the capability of the vehicle and the size of the vehicle's battery. Many vehicles that are designed to be sold all over the world are often limited to AC charging at about 7kW. This is often the limit of AC charging in other country markets. In Europe, three-phase power is more available, and this allows charging up to 22kW if the vehicle is designed to be able to accept that much AC power. Whatever the limitation of the vehicle for AC charging, most vehicles have the ability to accept a DC charge at 50kW or higher, which is fed directly to the battery, under the control of the car. Increasingly, public rapid chargers are being installed that can deliver 150kW or higher to compatible vehicles. As the capacity of batteries increase to give greater range, the speed of charging (AC or DC) becomes increasingly important.
  • What vehicles are eligible?
    All fully battery electric vehicles are eligible, but not all plug-in hybrids (PHEVs) are. PHEV CO2 emissions must be below 75g/km to qualify. OLEV provide a list of all eligible vehicles on their website.
  • How do I qualify?
    To qualify for the EVHS grant, you must meet a number of criteria; you must have purchased an eligible EV or plug-in hybrid after 1st October 2016; you must be able to provide evidence of keepership, lease, be named as the primary user of an eligible electric vehicle or have a vehicle on order; the date of installation must not be more than 4 months ahead of the date of delivery or start date of vehicle use; you must have off-street parking; you must purchase an approved charging point which is considered to be 'smart' (from 1st July 2019); and the charging station must be installed by an OLEV approved installer.
  • How do I claim the OLEV home charge grant?
    EVHS requires each grant claim to be submitted using a form that includes a customer declaration. If the form is filled out incorrectly then the claim will be marked as invalid, and payment will not be made. Once the grant form has been approved, the authorised chargepoint installer will claim the 75% of the cost (up to £500) on behalf of the customer, and the rest of the payment must be agreed privately.
  • The Energy Saving Trust (additional grant in Scotland)
    For EV drivers in Scotland, the Energy Saving Trust offers an additional grant of up to £300.
  • What is EVHS?
    The Electric Vehicle Homecharge Scheme (EVHS) is a government scheme which supports the purchase and installation of a charging station at a home. The grant is refered to as the "OLEV Grant", the "domestic grant", the "home grant" and "EVHS". The grant provides 75% of the installation and purchase cost, up to £500, for an eligible home charging station. You can claim for one chargepoint per eligible EV and for up to two EVs per household. The official guidance from OLEV is available here.
  • How does my business qualify?
    To qualify for the WCS, the organisation must been a number of criteria; the organisation must be a registered business, charity, or public sector organisation evidenced by a Companies House Reference Number, a VAT Registration Number or a HMRC Registration Letter. Or must be either; a Public Authority or have received less than €200,000 of public support in the last three fiscal years, or which is currently pending before applying for the WCS; can declare a need for electric vehicle charging equiptment or intent to encourage use; are located in England, Wales, Scotland or Northern Ireland; have dedicated off-street parking for staff/fleet vehicles; own the property/land or have consent from the landlord for chargepoints be installed at the sites listed in the application.
  • How does my business claim the grant?
    Applicants must apply for the scheme via the OLEV online portal. If the application is deemed to be eligible, then the applicant will be issued with a unique identification code via email which will be valid for four months / 120 days from the date of issue. Once the chargepoints have been installed, the OLEV approved installer will claim the grant using the unique code given. Installations made after the 4 month validation period cannot be claimed.
  • What is the WCS?
    The Workplace Charging Scheme (WCS) is a voucher based grant scheme which is designed to support the purchasing and installation cost of installing an EV chargepoint. The grant contribution is limited to 75% of the installation and purchasing cost, up to £500, for each socket and for up to 20 sockets across all sites for each applicant. The official guidance from OLEV is avaliable here. OLEV also advise all applicants to read WCS guidance from the Energy Saving trust.
  • Payment Methods
    Payments through our online shop are handled securely by WorldPay. For alternative payment methods, please contact us.
  • Wholesale and Trade Enquiries
    Drivenergy Ltd is the UK Partner for MENNEKES eMOBILITY. We bring to market the full range of MENNEKES products, and are always happy to discuss Wholesale and Trade enquiries. Please contact us and a member of our team will get back to you as soon as possible.
  • Shipping Policy
    All parcels are delievered by ParcelForce UK on a next day delivery service. If your item is in stock, orders placed before 11am should be dispatched the same working day*. ParcelForce next day delivery is only available in Mainland UK. Delivery to the Highlands and Islands will be dispatched on the same service, but delivery will take longer. We offer delivery to Jersey, Guernsey and the Isle of Man, but please contact us to arrange. To track your parcel please use the following link: www.parcelforce.com/track-trace. Larger consignments may require shipping using a pallet service. If this is the case, you will be contacted directly to arrange a suitable delivery. *Occasionally, same day dispatch may not be possible. If this is the case we aim to dispatch your delivery as soon as we can.
  • Warranty Guidance
    All of our cables are supplied with a 12 month warrenty from the date of sale against manufacturing defects.
  • GDPR and Privacy Statement
    Enter your answer here
  • Returns Policy
    We are happy to offer returns on any unwanted purchase if notified within 14 days of delivery. All items must be returned unused, in the original packaging, and in a saleable condition. We will refund you the total amount that you have paid for the product(s) that you are returning, unless the item has been damaged, used, or is unsaleable. Please contact us to discuss a return. All returns must be back in our warehouse within 28 days from date of delivery. The customer is responsible covering the cost of returning a shipment. Drivenergy is only responsible for the product once it is delivered to our warehouse. If your product is defective or faulty, please contact us as soon as possible. ​

  • Can I overcharge my vehicle?
    No. You are unable to overcharge your vehicle because the power flow is ended automatically by an integrated charging management system. The flow will be stopped once the EV is 'full', so leaving your EV plugged in is not a problem. If you are leaving your vehicle unused for a significant amount of time, it may be better for the battery if it is not left fully charged. Consult your vehicle dealer for advice on your vehicle model.
  • Can't I just charge my car on a socket at home?
    Yes, you can charge using a 3-pin plug at home but it is not recommended. Normal household sockets and wiring are not designed to take such a high continuous load. Regular charging should be done using a charge point that is able to safely take the continuous load, installed on a separate circuit right back to the 'consumer unit' or fuseboard. Using a 3-pin plug should only be done when no other option is available. If you do have to charge with a 3 pin plug, then we recommend having your electrics checked first by a qualified electrician to help to minimise risk. Before each charge, it is good practice to inspect the plugs, fuse and cable to check for any signs of wear which could influence your charge.
  • Are there grants to help towards the cost of installing an EV charger?
    Yes. The UK Government's Office of Low Emission Vehicles (OLEV) offer two types of grant; domestic (EVHS) and workplace (WCS). Each grant is for the value of 75% of the cost of a charger and installation, capped at £500. The two grants have specific criteria which you must meet to be eligible. To read our full guide to the OLEV grants click here or visit the OLEV website directly.
  • How do I apply for a workplace charger grant?
    Applicants must apply for the Workplace Charge Scheme (WCS) via an online portal. If the application is deemed to be eligible, then the applicant will be issued with a unique identification code via email which will be valid for four months/ 120 days from the date of issue. Once the chargepoints have been installed, the OLEV approved installer will claim the grant using the unique code given. Installations made after the 4 month validation period cannot be claimed for. Read our full guide to the OLEV grants here.
  • What 'real world' range can I expect from a vehicle?
    Just like with a petrol or diesel vehicle, 'manufacturers range' and 'real world range' are usually different; we suggest that taking 10% off the manufactures estimated range is usually offers a good guide. However, driving style and location have the largest influence on range. Driving moderately and conserving your speed will pay back in terms of range. Urban drivers who face low speed limits and generally flat ground will get a better range than rural drivers who face national speed limits and uneven ground. The bottom line is how you drive has a huge influence on range, just like a conventional vehicle. Drivers who are concious of this can (and do!) meet the expected manufacturers range from their vehicle. We have been driving EVs rurally for almost 20 years, and we have never ran out of juice! The only real difference to consider is seasonality. Using more 'stuff' on your vehicle will draw more power, so blasting your heater or air con will reduce your range slightly. Across peak summer and peak winter seasons using the air con or heater have much the same affect on range. The important thing to note is that in winter the battery capacity is affected by the cooler air temperature. In winter you will not get the same range as in the summer; it will be lower. This is because the colder temperatures cause the chemical reactions inside the battery to occur at a slower rate, so cold batteries discharge faster than warmer batteries. This doesnt mean that EVs don't work in the cold, they do, its just something to consider. A good resource to use for in depth vehicle reviews is Honest John.
  • What different types of electric vehicles are there? (BEV, PHEV and HEV)"
    It is generally accepted that there are 3 main types of electric vehicle; battery electric vehicles (BEVs), plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV) and hybrid electric vehicles (HEV). BEVs (more commonly known simply as EVs) are fully electric vehicles with rechargable batteries; they have no combustion engine and are 'fuelled' solely by using electricity. They also recoup energy by using the electric motor as a generator when slowing down, also minimising the production of brake dust by reduced wear on the conventional brakes. PHEVs have a battery much the same as a BEV, however it is much smaller. Once the battery power has been utilised, the vehicle continues to be powered by a combustion engine. PHEVs have a electric range of between 10-40 miles. A 'traditional' hybrid vehicle (HEV) has a very small battery which is used in connection with the combustion engine. The main difference between a PHEV and a HEV is the ability to charge the battery. You are unable to plug in a HEV to charge the battery, it is instead charged by the combustion engine. Using a battery in conjunction with the combustion engine offers slightly reduced tail pipe emissions, but ultimately HEVs are being charged by the combustion engine. There is no such thing as a 'self-charging' hybrid vehicle. For more information read our full guide to electric vehicle charging.
  • What are the different types of charging? (slow, fast and rapid)"
    There are 3 different types of charging; typically called 'slow', 'fast' and 'rapid' in the UK. Slow charging occurs at 3kW, and is most common in UK homes. At 3kW, a full charge is likely to take 5-8 hours, so slow charging is perfect for overnight use. Fast charging occurs at 7kW-22kW; a full charge at 7kW can typically take around 3-5 hours and at 22kW this could be reduced to as little as 2-3 hours. Charging above 7kW requires 'three phase' electricity which is not normally available in UK homes, but is often available elsewhere. Rapid charging can fill a vehicle battery by 80% in as little as 20 minutes. Rapid chargers are most commonly found at motorway services and at electric forecourts, where charging occurs at between 50kW and 350kW. It is important to note that these figures are only a guide, charging speed depends not only on the charger, but also the capability of the vehicle and the size of the vehicle's battery. For more information read our full guide to electric vehicle charging.
  • What types of charging plugs are there?
    Both EVs and PHEVs have built in batteries which needs to be recharged from an external mains supply. The vehicles have inlets for a charging cable to be connected to, but they are not all the same. The inlet on the vehicle will depend on manufacturers choice. Vehicles usually have two charging inlets; one for AC charging and one for DC. AC is used for slow and fast charging and DC is used for rapid charging. But sometimes vehicles have only one inlet for used for all charging. For AC charging, the Type 1 or Type 2 plug is used, and for DC CHAdeMO and CCS are used. Click here for a detailed explaination of the available charging plugs.
  • How do I apply for a home charger grant?
    The Electric Vehicle Homecharge Scheme (EVHS) requires each grant claim to be submitted using a form which includes a customer declaration. The authorised chargepoint installer will claim the 75% of the cost, up to £500, on behalf of the customer, and the rest of the payment must be agreed privately. If the form is filled out incorrectly then the claim will be marked as invalid, and payment will not be made. Read our full guide to the OLEV grants here.
  • Do I have 'three-phase' electricity?
    Three-phase electricity is a method of AC power transmission and distribution used to transfer power around the National Grid, right down to street level. It is unlikely that you have three-phase power at home (only around 5% of UK homes do and these are often very large homes or farms) but most businesses do have three-phase. To determine if you do have three-phase power, please consult your electrician or contact us.
  • Why do EVs charge at different rates?
    Charging speed depends not only on the capability of the charger / electrical connection (see above question), but also on the capability of the vehicle and the size of the vehicle's battery. Many vehicles that are designed to be sold all over the world are often limited to AC charging at about 7kW. This is often the limit of AC charging in other country markets. In Europe, three-phase power is more available, and this allows charging up to 22kW if the vehicle is designed to be able to accept that much AC power. Whatever the limitation of the vehicle for AC charging, most vehicles have the ability to accept a DC charge at 50kW or higher, which is fed directly to the battery, under the control of the car. Increasingly, public rapid chargers are being installed that can deliver 150kW or higher to compatible vehicles. As the capacity of batteries increase to give greater range, the speed of charging (AC or DC) becomes increasingly important.
  • What vehicles are eligible?
    All fully battery electric vehicles are eligible, but not all plug-in hybrids (PHEVs) are. PHEV CO2 emissions must be below 75g/km to qualify. OLEV provide a list of all eligible vehicles on their website.
  • How do I qualify?
    To qualify for the EVHS grant, you must meet a number of criteria; you must have purchased an eligible EV or plug-in hybrid after 1st October 2016; you must be able to provide evidence of keepership, lease, be named as the primary user of an eligible electric vehicle or have a vehicle on order; the date of installation must not be more than 4 months ahead of the date of delivery or start date of vehicle use; you must have off-street parking; you must purchase an approved charging point which is considered to be 'smart' (from 1st July 2019); and the charging station must be installed by an OLEV approved installer.
  • How do I claim the OLEV home charge grant?
    EVHS requires each grant claim to be submitted using a form that includes a customer declaration. If the form is filled out incorrectly then the claim will be marked as invalid, and payment will not be made. Once the grant form has been approved, the authorised chargepoint installer will claim the 75% of the cost (up to £500) on behalf of the customer, and the rest of the payment must be agreed privately.
  • The Energy Saving Trust (additional grant in Scotland)
    For EV drivers in Scotland, the Energy Saving Trust offers an additional grant of up to £300.
  • What is EVHS?
    The Electric Vehicle Homecharge Scheme (EVHS) is a government scheme which supports the purchase and installation of a charging station at a home. The grant is refered to as the "OLEV Grant", the "domestic grant", the "home grant" and "EVHS". The grant provides 75% of the installation and purchase cost, up to £500, for an eligible home charging station. You can claim for one chargepoint per eligible EV and for up to two EVs per household. The official guidance from OLEV is available here.
  • How does my business qualify?
    To qualify for the WCS, the organisation must been a number of criteria; the organisation must be a registered business, charity, or public sector organisation evidenced by a Companies House Reference Number, a VAT Registration Number or a HMRC Registration Letter. Or must be either; a Public Authority or have received less than €200,000 of public support in the last three fiscal years, or which is currently pending before applying for the WCS; can declare a need for electric vehicle charging equiptment or intent to encourage use; are located in England, Wales, Scotland or Northern Ireland; have dedicated off-street parking for staff/fleet vehicles; own the property/land or have consent from the landlord for chargepoints be installed at the sites listed in the application.
  • How does my business claim the grant?
    Applicants must apply for the scheme via the OLEV online portal. If the application is deemed to be eligible, then the applicant will be issued with a unique identification code via email which will be valid for four months / 120 days from the date of issue. Once the chargepoints have been installed, the OLEV approved installer will claim the grant using the unique code given. Installations made after the 4 month validation period cannot be claimed.
  • What is the WCS?
    The Workplace Charging Scheme (WCS) is a voucher based grant scheme which is designed to support the purchasing and installation cost of installing an EV chargepoint. The grant contribution is limited to 75% of the installation and purchasing cost, up to £500, for each socket and for up to 20 sockets across all sites for each applicant. The official guidance from OLEV is avaliable here. OLEV also advise all applicants to read WCS guidance from the Energy Saving trust.
  • Payment Methods
    Payments through our online shop are handled securely by WorldPay. For alternative payment methods, please contact us.
  • Wholesale and Trade Enquiries
    Drivenergy Ltd is the UK Partner for MENNEKES eMOBILITY. We bring to market the full range of MENNEKES products, and are always happy to discuss Wholesale and Trade enquiries. Please contact us and a member of our team will get back to you as soon as possible.
  • Shipping Policy
    All parcels are delievered by ParcelForce UK on a next day delivery service. If your item is in stock, orders placed before 11am should be dispatched the same working day*. ParcelForce next day delivery is only available in Mainland UK. Delivery to the Highlands and Islands will be dispatched on the same service, but delivery will take longer. We offer delivery to Jersey, Guernsey and the Isle of Man, but please contact us to arrange. To track your parcel please use the following link: www.parcelforce.com/track-trace. Larger consignments may require shipping using a pallet service. If this is the case, you will be contacted directly to arrange a suitable delivery. *Occasionally, same day dispatch may not be possible. If this is the case we aim to dispatch your delivery as soon as we can.
  • Warranty Guidance
    All of our cables are supplied with a 12 month warrenty from the date of sale against manufacturing defects.
  • GDPR and Privacy Statement
    Enter your answer here
  • Returns Policy
    We are happy to offer returns on any unwanted purchase if notified within 14 days of delivery. All items must be returned unused, in the original packaging, and in a saleable condition. We will refund you the total amount that you have paid for the product(s) that you are returning, unless the item has been damaged, used, or is unsaleable. Please contact us to discuss a return. All returns must be back in our warehouse within 28 days from date of delivery. The customer is responsible covering the cost of returning a shipment. Drivenergy is only responsible for the product once it is delivered to our warehouse. If your product is defective or faulty, please contact us as soon as possible. ​
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